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Jacopo Robusti Tintoretto

1518-1594 Italian Tintoretto Galleries The real name of Tintoretto was Jacopo Robusti, but he is better known by his nickname, meaning the "little dyer, " his father having been a silk dyer. The artist was born in Venice and lived there all his life. Even though his painting is distinguished by great daring, he seems to have led a rather retired life, concerned only with his work and the well-being of his family. His daughter Marietta and his sons Domenico and Marco also became painters, and Domenico eventually took over the direction of Tintoretto's large workshop, turning out reliable but un-inspired pictures in the manner of his father. Some of them are, on occasion, mistaken for works of the elder Tintoretto. Tintoretto appears to have studied with Bonifazio Veronese or Paris Bordone, but his true master, as of all the great Venetian painters in his succession, was Titian. Tintoretto's work by no means merely reflects the manner of Titian. Instead he builds on Titian's art and brings into play an imagination so fiery and quick that he creates an effect of restlessness which is quite opposed to the staid and majestic certainty of Titian's statements. If Tintoretto's pictures at first sight often astonish by their melodrama, they almost inevitably reveal, at closer observation, a focal point celebrating the wonders of silence and peace. The sensation of this ultimate gentleness, after the first riotous impact, is particularly touching and in essence not different from what we find (although brought about by very different means) in the pictures of Titian and Paolo Veronese. Tintoretto was primarily a figure painter and delighted in showing his figures in daring foreshortening and expansive poses. His master in this aspect of his art was Michelangelo. Tintoretto is supposed to have inscribed on the wall of his studio the motto: "The drawing of Michelangelo and the color of Titian." Unlike Michelangelo, however, Tintoretto worked and drew very quickly, using only lights and shadows in the modeling of his forms, so that his figures look as if they had gained their plasticity by a kind of magic. In the rendering of large compositions he is reported to have used as models small figures which he made of wax and placed or hung in boxes so cleverly illuminated that the conditions of light and shade in the picture he was painting would be the same as those in the room in which it was to be hung.

Jacopo Robusti Tintoretto St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  1644
  1560 National Gallery, London
  1560 National Gallery, London

 

 
   
      

Paolo Ucello

1395-1475 Italian Paolo Ucello Gallery

Paolo Ucello St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  3225
  National Gallery, London
  National Gallery, London

 

 
   
      

Raphael

Italian High Renaissance Painter, 1483-1520 Raphael Sanzio, usually known by his first name alone (in Italian Raffaello) (April 6 or March 28, 1483 ?C April 6, 1520), was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance, celebrated for the perfection and grace of his paintings and drawings. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period. Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and, despite his early death at thirty-seven, a large body of his work remains, especially in the Vatican, whose frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career, although unfinished at his death. After his early years in Rome, much of his work was designed by him and executed largely by the workshop from his drawings, with considerable loss of quality. He was extremely influential in his lifetime, though outside Rome his work was mostly known from his collaborative printmaking. After his death, the influence of his great rival Michelangelo was more widespread until the 18th and 19th centuries, when Raphael's more serene and harmonious qualities were again regarded as the highest models. His career falls naturally into three phases and three styles, first described by Giorgio Vasari: his early years in Umbria, then a period of about four years (from 1504-1508) absorbing the artistic traditions of Florence, followed by his last hectic and triumphant twelve years in Rome, working for two Popes and their close associates.

Raphael St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  3313
  1504-06 11 1/8" x 8 3/8" The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
  1504-06 11 1/8" x 8 3/8" The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

 

 
   
      

Giovanni Sodoma

1477-1549 Giovanni Sodoma Galleries

Giovanni Sodoma St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  3803
  1518 The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
  1518 The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

 

 
   
      

Jacopo Tintoretto

1518-1594 Italian painter. His father was a silk dyer (tintore); hence the nickname Tintoretto ("Little Dyer"). His early influences include Michelangelo and Titian. In Christ and the Adulteress (c. 1545) figures are set in vast spaces in fanciful perspectives, in distinctly Mannerist style. In 1548 he became the centre of attention of artists and literary men in Venice with his St. Mark Freeing the Slave, so rich in structural elements of post-Michelangelo Roman art that it is surprising to learn that he had never visited Rome. By 1555 he was a famous and sought-after painter, with a style marked by quickness of execution, great vivacity of colour, a predilection for variegated perspective, and a dynamic conception of space. In his most important undertaking, the decoration of Venice's Scuola Grande di San Rocco (1564 ?C 88), he exhibited his passionate style and profound religious faith. His technique and vision were wholly personal and constantly evolving.

Jacopo Tintoretto St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  29213
  mk65 Oil on canvas 48x36"
  mk65 Oil on canvas 48x36"

 

 
   
      

SANO di Pietro

Italian Early Renaissance Painter, 1406-1481

SANO di Pietro St.George and the Dragon painting


St.George and the Dragon
St.George and the Dragon
Painting ID::  55953
  mk247 c.1440-70,tempera on panel,museo diocesano,siena,ltaly
  mk247 c.1440-70,tempera on panel,museo diocesano,siena,ltaly

 

 
   
      

Tintoretto

Italian Mannerist Painter, ca.1518-1594 His father was a silk dyer (tintore); hence the nickname Tintoretto ("Little Dyer"). His early influences include Michelangelo and Titian. In Christ and the Adulteress (c. 1545) figures are set in vast spaces in fanciful perspectives, in distinctly Mannerist style. In 1548 he became the centre of attention of artists and literary men in Venice with his St. Mark Freeing the Slave, so rich in structural elements of post-Michelangelo Roman art that it is surprising to learn that he had never visited Rome. By 1555 he was a famous and sought-after painter, with a style marked by quickness of execution, great vivacity of colour, a predilection for variegated perspective, and a dynamic conception of space. In his most important undertaking, the decoration of Venice's Scuola Grande di San Rocco (1564 C 88), he exhibited his passionate style and profound religious faith. His technique and vision were wholly personal and constantly evolving.

Tintoretto st.george and the dragon painting


st.george and the dragon
st.george and the dragon
Painting ID::  56023
  mk247 c.1558,oil on canvas,62x39.5 in,157.5x100.3 cm,national,gallery,london,uk
  mk247 c.1558,oil on canvas,62x39.5 in,157.5x100.3 cm,national,gallery,london,uk

 

 
   
      

Tintoretto
Italian Mannerist Painter, ca.1518-1594 His father was a silk dyer (tintore); hence the nickname Tintoretto ("Little Dyer"). His early influences include Michelangelo and Titian. In Christ and the Adulteress (c. 1545) figures are set in vast spaces in fanciful perspectives, in distinctly Mannerist style. In 1548 he became the centre of attention of artists and literary men in Venice with his St. Mark Freeing the Slave, so rich in structural elements of post-Michelangelo Roman art that it is surprising to learn that he had never visited Rome. By 1555 he was a famous and sought-after painter, with a style marked by quickness of execution, great vivacity of colour, a predilection for variegated perspective, and a dynamic conception of space. In his most important undertaking, the decoration of Venice's Scuola Grande di San Rocco (1564 C 88), he exhibited his passionate style and profound religious faith. His technique and vision were wholly personal and constantly evolving.
st.george and the dragon
mk247 c.1558,oil on canvas,62x39.5 in,157.5x100.3 cm,national,gallery,london,uk

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